Archive for the ‘Water Heater’ Category

Does Your Water Heater Need Repairs?

Monday, February 10th, 2020

Your water heater is perhaps one of the most important components of your plumbing system—how else would you take those long baths after a stressful day of work? But, like all important and hard-worked pieces of equipment, your water heater is bound to require repairs at some time or another.

Fortunately, there are a number of signs that indicate it’s time for Palm Harbor water heater services, and below, we have outlined some of them for you. All you have to do is keep reading to find out more (and of course, remember to schedule your services with our team!)

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Water Heater Maintenance…Tips and Tricks

Monday, July 23rd, 2012

A water heater is an appliance that your family uses every day.  When it fails to provide adequate hot water, clothing starts coming out of the wash looking dingy, dishes just aren’t as sparkly as they once were, showers aren’t long or comfortable enough and  it’s noticeable to all!  Know how to recognize the warning signs and know what to do when your water heater is not making the grade.

Some of the thing to keep an eye out for are:

  • Running out of hot water quicker than normal
    • This could indicate that you’re a victim of sedimentation, which is a buildup of sediment in the bottom of the tank. Sometimes, your water heater isn’t failing, the sediment  is the reason for running out of water too soon.  Sediment collects in the bottom of the water heater creating sludge that replaces water.  As a result the volume of water gets reduced and yout water heater has to work harder. Part of out MVP inspection is the draining and flushing of sediment from your water heater. It is the most overlooked task around a home, and we have some of the most sediment heavy water in the country!
  • Water suddenly looks rusty and smells bad
    • Rusty water can mean there is corrosion inside your water heater.  If this is the case, the tank and anode rods need to be checked, so we can determine which is the culprit and repair or replace the part if possible.
    • Bad odor in water.  This is also caused by sediment.  Over time sediment breeds bacteria.  A decaying anode gives off hydrogen gas, which nourishes the bacteria; these bacteria produce a nasty smell, like rotten eggs.  Get rid of the sediment to get rid of the smell.
  • Water heater makes noises
    • If your water heater is making noises, that may mean the water is overheating.  This again is attributed to the sediment buildup.  The noise is produced when the water in the tank begins to boil.
  • Water heater is leaking
    • If you have a puddle underneath your water heater, check it out.  This can be due to gaskets or fittings or nearby pipes.
    • The temperature pressure valve (TPR) can also create a puddle, make sure the TPR is closing correctly.   Sometimes the TPR is defective and will need to be replaced.  A non-functioning TPR valve is very serious and can even cause your tank to explode.  Have a professional plumber replace defective TPR valves immediately.
    • If you notice rusty water around the bottom of your water heater chances are the bottom has rusted out and it is leaking.  The only solution at this point is to replace your water heater.

 

One of the most important ways to prevent these common problems is to make sure you are following a regular maintenance plan with your water heater.  It is very important to drain your water heater annually.  This rids the tank of sediment buildup, which left unchecked causes a multitude of problems.

 

You can save money in the long run by avoiding breakdowns and extending the life of your appliance with regular water heater maintenance. So don’t sweat, call Bayonet, and you’ll be protected with 5 year warranties on any repair we make for as long as you’re an MVP member.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Raising The Efficiency on Water Heating

Monday, January 9th, 2012

When focusing on making your home more energy efficient, savvy homeowners take aim at their air conditioning unit first. That’s a smart thing to do. But what appliance should be next in line for improvement? You guessed it: your water heater.

Most homeowners in the Tampa area have a standard electric water heater with 40, 50, or 80 gallon capacity depending on the size of the home. Some homeowners are option for the tankless style water heaters. Check back on the 23rd of January for lots of information on those units.

For now, let’s discuss efficiency of those standard, tried-and-true electric, tank style water heaters. Simply put, there’s no way to make them super efficient, but you can help make the one you have work to its fullest potential. First, make sure your anode rod is not disintegrated and if it is replace it with a new one. This keeps the metal parts from corroding over time and extends the longevity of the water heater. Next, ask yourself this question: when was the last time the water heater was drained and cleared of sediment? Most homeowners answer that question with: “that needs to be done?” Yes, it does! Our Florida water is hard, which means it contains lots of minerals; minerals that build up in your tank and collect on the heating elements making the heater work harder to bring your water to an acceptable temperature.

If you’re an MVP member with Bayonet, this is a routine maintenance job that is included as part of the annual plumbing inspection. If you’ve never had it done, give your water heater some attention soon! Your wallet will thank you when you pay your next power bill.

If your water heater has reached the end of its life span and you’re shopping for a new one, heat pump water heaters are the most efficient available in a standard tank-style heater. They employ a small compressor that blows cool air out of the top of the unit, and the waste energy actually heats the water. It’s a great side benefit, as most water heaters are in garages and everyone in the garage benefits from a little cool down!

As a GE factory authorized dealer, we’re big fans of the GE heat pump water heater. It’s 10-year parts warranty shows consumers how much GE believes in it. It only comes in a 50 gallon tall model presently.

If you’ve recently replaced a tank style heater and didn’t know about this technology, you can still employ it thanks to the retro-fitted Air Tap, which converts the standard electric water heater into a heat pump with relative ease. We tested the Air Tap by installing it in an employee’s barn. She gets plenty of hot water, even on very cold days, and never even hooked the power up to the water heater. The beauty of the Air Tap–and all heat pump water heaters, for that matter–is how very little energy they use to heat water!

If you’re upgrading appliances this year, the water heater is a great place to focus!

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